Beetroot & Squash Soup

Beetroot And Squash Soup

Beetroot & Squash Soup

Beetroot and squash are both naturally sweet, full of nutrients, and store well – making an ideal soup for the winter months.

If growing your own beetroot, the beets can be left in place over winter and harvested when needed.

Squash can be a prolific plant producing many fruit. The squash should be harvested late autumn before the first frost, and stored in a cool environment.

Read on for the full recipe, or see all soups.


Watch How To Make Beetroot & Squash Soup

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Beetroot & Squash Soup

Ingredients

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Method

If growing your own beetroot, the beets can be left in place over winter and harvested when needed. 

Squash can be a prolific plant producing many fruit. This picture shows one plant on my allotment – it needs a lot of space to grow. In total, this one plant produced almost 20 squashes, each about the size of a football.

The fruits should be harvested late autumn before the first frost, and stored in a cool environment. 

I think crown prince squash tastes better than butternut squash, but butternut is a good alternative and is easier to buy. 

Large squash can be difficult to cut. I used a sharp knife and cut out segments – similar to cutting cake.

The inside flesh of the squash has a beautiful bright orange colour. 

Carefully cut away the outer skin of the squash using a sharp knife. The skin is likely to be too hard for a normal vegetable peeler.

The beetroot is prepared by cutting off the tops and tails, before peeling away the skin. The beets will cook much faster if grated.

However, I find grating messy and time consuming. If you have a chopper this is much faster. 

Cut the beets into chunks and add these to the chopper. Depending on the size of the chopper bowl, you may need to do this in batches.

Repeat the process with the squash. Make sure all the skin is removed first. Neither the squash nor the beetroot needs long in the chopper, small pieces are fine.

Garlic is full of nutrients. I like to add several cloves to the soup. I smash the cloves to remove the outer skin, before slicing the cloves into small chunks.

Any type of onion will do, but in this soup I am using the last few shallots I grew last summer. The shallots also need the skin removed and chopped.

I used one stock cube per litre of water for the stock – not to make the soup too salty. For a richer taste, use two stock cubes. Stir the stock well.

Now all the ingredients are prepared, making the soup is very easy.

Take a large saucepan and add the beetroot, followed by the squash, the garlic, and the onion, before pouring the prepared stock over the top and giving the mixture a really good stir.

Transfer the pan to a high heat and bring the soup to the boil. Once boiling point is reached, turn the heat down low, just enough to simmer the soup for a further 10 to 15 minutes. Stir the soup every now and then to check nothing is sticking to the bottom.

And that’s it. All that remains is to blend the soup before serving. I used a handheld blender to do this, which took a couple of minutes before all the lumps were removed.

I like to serve the soup with fresh bread and a little butter. Delicious! 

The soup will store in the fridge for a few days, or freeze any that is leftover for another time.